Another Spring Fling Prize Pack

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Fruit Share Manitoba would like to extend our thanks to the following Spring Fling prize pack sponsors (clockwise from top left):

Long time Fruit Share picking volunteer and fan Sew Dandee is donating a prize pack!

Thanks to Manitoba Chicken for supporting the Spring Fling with a beautiful cookbook from Great Tastes of Manitoba.

We needed a POPP of chocolate in our assortment of awesome door prizes so Constance Popp Chocolates donated this prize pack: a box of gorgeous fruit-infused chocolate truffles. There’s even a rhubarb one!

Spring Fling Prize Packs!

FS prizes 1

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Fruit Share Manitoba would like to extend our thanks to the following Spring Fling prize pack sponsors (clockwise from top left):

Manitoba Canola Growers donated this backpack filled with recipes, cool cooking tools and a pretty snazzy apron.

The U of M Press jumped in with a great bundle of books, including Forest Prairie Edge by Merle Massie, Growing Resistance by Emily Eaton, and Winnipeg Beach by Dale Barbour.

Looking for a new do for this year’s fruit season? Salon POP has donated a complimentary cut, colour and follow up visit with Carrie and some Aveda hair products.

Volunteer Interview – Ariel Gordon

Ariel Gordon sits under a tree by the community centre in Wolseley. Her energetic young daughter, Anna, bounces about like the Energizer Bunny in an animé t-shirt. I try not to fangirl too much as she graciously signs my copy of her latest book of poetry, Stowaways.

Ariel is a dedicated Fruit Share volunteer. She says she has been to almost every kind of pick – grapes, chokecherries, cherries, pears, vegetables (“that was astounding and different. You know how cucumbers become all orange and bloated when they’re overripe? It’s so funny! There were these weird orange globes on the ground.”), and of course lots of apples (“and crab apples!” her daughter chimes in). On picks, Anna is in charge of collecting the fallen fruit. She loves doing that because “you get to run around a lot.”

From Australia to Winnipeg – by Pascale R

strawberry

There’s a scary and growing trend where we consume and discard fruit and vegetables without a second thought to it. It’s so easily accessible to us, in grocery stores, in markets, at restaurants, that tossing it out is never a concern because we can easily replace it. This leads to a lot of wastage. How much is a lot? In Canada alone it’s 2.5 billion alone in fresh produce.

When I moved to Canada from Australia a couple of years ago, I wanted to get involved in the community and be part of a sustainable project. Our fresh produce wastage numbers are scary, but that’s nothing compared to the wastage that’s occurring in our own backyards without us even realizing it.