A Typical Pick – What to Expect From Start to Finish

Even after all these years, I still get a little nervous when I get a confirmation of a pick. Of course I’m excited about the thought of fresh, free fruit, but not knowing the homeowner or any of the other volunteers who signed up is a little unnerving. Going to a stranger’s house to meet strangers to pick someone else’s fruit feels a little odd – doesn’t it?

But while it may feel awkward at first, this is different. This is about helping a neighbour, meeting new people, rescuing fruit, and sharing with others. This is about building community and doing a good thing. So go on, ring that doorbell.

Wait, are you supposed to ring the doorbell on a pick?

Volunteer Interview – Ariel Gordon

Ariel Gordon sits under a tree by the community centre in Wolseley. Her energetic young daughter, Anna, bounces about like the Energizer Bunny in an animé t-shirt. I try not to fangirl too much as she graciously signs my copy of her latest book of poetry, Stowaways.

Ariel is a dedicated Fruit Share volunteer. She says she has been to almost every kind of pick – grapes, chokecherries, cherries, pears, vegetables (“that was astounding and different. You know how cucumbers become all orange and bloated when they’re overripe? It’s so funny! There were these weird orange globes on the ground.”), and of course lots of apples (“and crab apples!” her daughter chimes in). On picks, Anna is in charge of collecting the fallen fruit. She loves doing that because “you get to run around a lot.”

Fruit Share Receives Manitoba Sustainability Award

Congratulations Fruit Share volunteers and fruit owners on earning a Manitoba Excellence in Sustainability Award!

Fruit Share Sustainability Award 2013

Fruit Share Advisory Team Members Laura Rawluk, Katie Anderson and Getty Stewart accept award from Minister Gord Mackintosh. Source Tracey Goncalves, Government of Manitoba Photographer.

The Manitoba Excellence in Sustainability Awards are given out each year to recognize Manitobans who embrace the spirit and principles of sustainable development. Fruit Share earned it’s award for Sustainability in Pollution Prevention and Product Stewardship, one of seven award categories.

During the nomination process, we received several amazing letters of support from organizations that we greatly admire. I wanted to share some of their words with you today, so that you get a sense of how much your work as a Fruit Share volunteer or fruit owner is appreciated.

What’s the Buzz about Fruit Share?

Welcome to new friends and familiar ones! We are looking forward to the 2014 season ahead. In the meantime, we thought this would be a great opportunity to share more information about the organization and what we are about.

 

The Back Story

The revolution began in the spring of 2010. Frustrated with fresh, local, nutritious fruit going to waste, and the desire to help others, Getty Stewart started Fruit Share in her South Osborne neighborhood. The inspiration to create Fruit Share came to Getty after reading an article about volunteer fruit rescuing operations in cities like Vancouver, Toronto, Edmonton, Calgary, and Victoria. During the first summer, 10 volunteers harvested over 1,600 pounds of fruit at 20 picks and calls started to come in from all over Winnipeg. By the second year, Fruit Share grew to a stunning 201 volunteers harvesting over 7,300 pounds of fruit from 153 registered fruit owners.