Good Riddance Fruit Flies!

You may have noticed that these pesky bugs have returned with a vengence in the past few weeks! Fruit flies tend to build in population in the summer as harvest time approaches and they reproduce very rapidly. The flies are attracted to fermenting fruit and can smell the scent of ripeness from quite a distance.

overripe banana

Overripe banana

Did you know that fruit flies can travel up to 6.5 miles in a 24 hour period?

Fruit flies can be challenging to eliminate, but there are a few tips that can help to control them:

  • Store fruit and vegetables in the refrigerator as they approach ripeness
  • If you are noticing fruit flies, dispose of overripe or bruised/damaged fruit or vegetables

Apple Celebration

You are invited!

Fruit Share is hosting a country fair style celebration at the Osborne South Sidewalk Festival.
Join us and mingle with other fruit lovers! Free.

When: Saturday, August 25 from noon until 4:30 pm
Where: Fort Rouge Leisure Centre parking lot (625 Osborne Street)
What: There will be apple peeling, bobbing for apples, apple stamp painting, face painting, apple on a spoon racing, pin the stem on the apple… and a table selling apple cider from Fruit Share apples, baking and preserves. And a draw for a door prize!

Hope to see you there!

More cider picks this week!

We have 3 more apple extravaganza picks happening this week!

We’re looking to gather a group of 6 or 7 volunteers who can spend a morning, afternoon or evening together picking apples at a few sites. Volunteers will be welcome to take home a small bag of apples, but the majority will be dedicated to Fruit Share. We then have a few volunteers that have signed up to transport our apples out to Apple Junction, where they will collect until we have enough to make a great batch of fresh apple cider. The cider will be sold at events as a fundraiser for fruit share, starting with the Osborne South Sidewalk Festival, at which Fruit Share will be hosting a mini country fair! Volunteers who participate in the picks will be able to purchase cider at a reduced price (to be determined as it will be based on how much we can pick and press).

Apple Picking Extravaganzas

It is that time of year again, more apples than most people can figure out what to do with! To handle the great amounts we are seeing, we’re going to be organizing to have a whole ton of apples pressed into cider at Apple Junction. Over the next couple of weeks, we’ll be organizing several apple picking extravaganzas: gathering a group of 6 or 7 volunteers, and spending a morning, afternoon or evening together picking apples at a few sites. Volunteers will be welcome to take home a small bag of apples, but the majority will be dedicated to Fruit Share. We then have a few volunteers that have signed up to transport our apples out to apple junction, where they will collect until we have enough to make a great batch of fresh apple cider. The cider will be sold at events as a fundraiser for fruit share. Volunteers who participate in the picks will be able to purchase cider at a reduced price (to be determined as it will be based on how much we can pick and press).

It’s worth a trip to Apple Junction

This morning,  my travelling buddy (Hector) and I, buckled up and drove over 800 lbs of apples to Apple Junction near Landmark, Manitoba.  It was pressing day and we were scheduled to have some fresh, Manitoba Apple Cider made.

The van was packed with apples harvested by volunteers from backyards throughout the city.  Thanks to the homeowners who offered up their apple trees and to the phenomenal volunteers who climbed, picked, raked and schlepped all those apples.

Here`s a play-by-play slideshow of my trip to Apple Junction.  Enjoy!

Click here: Apple Cider Making Slideshow

to see how we went from this…

…to this .

Apples for Apple Cider from Apple Junction

There’s a saying about making lemonade when you have lemons.  Well, we’ve got apples, so we’re making apple cider!

We have a lot of picking opportunities all around the city.  If you’re not already actively picking apples, Apple Cider is another reason why you might want to get picking this weekend.

Between now and Tuesday, all apples are being picked for the purpose of making apple cider.  Only volunteers helping to pick these apples will get an opportunity to buy some of this delicious, fresh, organic apple cider.

Take a look at how and where it’s made in this post from last year.  Apple Cider 2010

Poll: would you like apple juice?

We are excited to be planning several crab apple picks in mid-August in which the third of the fruit picked that would normally go towards the volunteers will instead go to making apple juice at Apple Junction. We would love to get your input on this – would you be interested in picking crab apples to turn into apple juice? Please answer the poll below so that we can see how many people are interested:



Since we need to drive the crab apples outside of Winnipeg to reach Apple Junction and pay for jugs, we’ll need to charge a small fee for you to receive some tasty apple cider. Please answer the poll below so that we can get an idea of how much you’d be willing to pay. That way we can work out if we’ll be able to conduct this endeavor.

A Drive to Apple Junction

Back in the old country, my family had an orchard right next to our circa 1600 Bauernhaus (farm house) on the outskirts of our small farming village.  We had plums, apricots, pears, cherries and apples.   While we preserved much of that fruit for our own use, we took many of our apples to the apple mill in the city.  We would drop off bushels of apples and return home with glass bottles of fresh pressed apple cider*.

Memories of those trips came flooding back as I packed up the kids for our own journey to Apple Junction just East of Landmark, Manitoba.  We were excited to turn our bruised and dented apples from our tree shaking experience from last week, into fresh, delicious apple cider.